Causes of a Displaced Uterus


shutterstock_128571875

This is the year of the uterus here at M+BL!  I took a life-changing training back in January about how to put a uterus back into it’s proper place.  I also learned about all the health issues that can manifest in women who have a displaced uterus and some amazing self-healing tools like Vaginal Steam Baths and Castor Oil Packs.

Today I want to talk about things that may have actually caused your uterus to be in the wrong spot in the first place.  Read on to learn more.   And P.S.  if you are local to south florida or are willing to travel, please make an appointment to see me!  I have been a massage therapist and healer for 14 years and now I am an Arvigo Mayan Abdominal Therapy Practitioner as well.  I also do Skype sessions and can teach you self-care/self healing things you can do on your own, if you can’t find a practitioner in your area.

  1. Repeated pregnancies close together.  Traditional wisdom says that postpartum is three years and not six weeks and that children should be spaced at least three years apart to give your body and uterine ligaments a chance to heal and recuperate.
  2. Bad professional care during pregnancy and afterwards.  Sad to say it, but there are way too many inexperienced and just plain callous health practitioners out there “taking care” of women who have no idea how damaging their rough hands can be.   Premature and excessive pushing during delivery, yanking on the baby with hands or forceps, and rough pelvic exams can all damage uterine ligaments and knock a uterus out of place.
  3. Carrying something heavy during pregnancy, postpartum and menstruation.  When you pick up something heavy, the downward pressure on a possibly already damaged and weak uterine ligaments will cause, you guessed it, more damage.   When you have a child, it is so hard to not pick them up when you are pregnant or on your period, but do your best not to lift anything heavy.  This is old, old traditional wisdom and is to be taken very seriously.  And definitely don’t carry your kids on your hip, that causes all kinds of pelvis misaligment and muscle spasms.  Use any of a variety of carriers instead and evenly distribute the weight throughout your whole body.
  4. Walking barefoot on cold grass or tile. I know this sounds totally kooky, but I believe it!  And I totally understand now why my Argentian/German mother-in-law would yell at me for walking barefoot on tile.  When you walk barefoot on something cold, it contracts the nerves, arteries, veins, and lymph, further congesting the flow of fluids to and from the pelvis.
  5. Wearing high heeled shoes.  When I was a dancer, my very old, Russian-trained ballet teacher, told us to never wear heels because it would mess up our calf and pelvic muscles for ballet, but now I wonder if he was also passing on traditional wisdom to keep our uteri healthy as well.  When you wear high heals, your low back stays in a constant state of contraction to help you keep your balance.  When the back muscles do that, besides the aches which are no fun, it also inhibits fluid flow to your pelvic organs and pulls on the ligaments which can make your uterus get out of place.  Wearing high heels every now and again is fine, it’s the all day, everyday that can get a woman in trouble.
  6. Running on cement surfaces. The repeated striking of the feet on hard cement sends shock waves through the body that is finally absorbed in the pelvis and uterus.  It’s like stretching a rubber band a thousand times a day, eventually the rubber band is going to weaken and become flaccid.  Speed walking is a much healthier alternative to running.
  7. Injury to the sacrum or tailbone from a fall at any point in your life, even childhood.  Just the other week Penelope fell off a stool directly on her tailbone.  I was totally distraught because I knew she could have knocked her uterus out of place, not to mention her cervical vertebrae (I took her to the chiropractor the next day and she did in fact knock her neck out and I did abdominal massage on her to help heal any uterine damage – did you know that a child’s uterus is full size in babyhood, it’s part of why their bellies pooch out a bit!).
  8. Chronic constipation.  The organs of the pelvis are so close together that when something is off in one organ, it greatly affects the other organs.  When the colon is constantly full of digestive waste, it fills the space where the uterus is supposed to naturally rest.
  9. Poor alignment of the pelvic bones and spine.  Y’all know what a fan I am of chiropractic care, because if your spine is not in alignment it’s impossible to be healthy, the health of your uterus and pelvis included.
  10. Sedentary Lifestyle.  Sitting all day in front of a computer or in a car and then later on a couch to watch TV is not healthy for reproductive organs for both men and women.
  11. Emotional Armoring.  From rape, sexual abuse or incest at anytime in life, even violent or stressful potty training and spanking as a child can cause your pelvic area and uterus to store trauma. Traumatic vaginal and cesarean births and miscarriages almost always cause your uterus to store stress and trauma from those events. Basically stress and trauma gets stored in your muscles (organs are muscles) as a way for you to survive.  Your body literally stores it for you to deal with a later time when you are able to.   But as you are waiting to deal with the trauma and stress, it causes all kind of havoc on your body, especially your uterus, because energetically the uterus is the emotional heart of a woman.

As always, I highly recommend finding a Mayan Massage practitioner in your area or working with a skilled bodyworker/energy healer.  If you are in South Florida, or just want to travel, you can come see me!  As of February 2014, I am an Arvigo Mayan Abdominal Therapy Practitioner.  Click here to learn more about my trainings and experience  and click here to schedule an appointment with me. 


About the Author

Hiya! I'm Stephanie. Mama and Baby Love is all about helping mothers on their own personal health and healing journey and enjoying life along the way. You can learn more about me and what I'm all about. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips, info and inspiration!

Comments

  1. Do you have suggestions for other kinds of prolapse? Would the same healing strategies work for a cystocele and rectocele? I would appreciate any thoughts, suggestions, or resources. Thanks!

Speak Your Mind

*