Clean your Pots and Pans like a Pro


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After you have cooked your meal and your pot is all brown and crazy looking at the bottom, you have two options.  You can make a yummy sauce by doing something that is called deglazing.  Where you add some stock or wine, turn up the heat and then use a wooden spatula or spoon to scrape up the brown bits at the bottom. You can add some arrowroot flour or all purpose gluten free flour to thicken it up if you want too.

But if you are not making a sauce and just want to straight up clean up your pot, then just add water, turn up the heat and scrap away.  Dump your gunky water once to see what is left and repeat the process till your pot is clean!

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Hiya! I'm Stephanie. Mama and Baby Love is all about helping mothers on their own personal health and healing journey and enjoying life along the way. You can learn more about me and what I'm all about. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips, info and inspiration!

Comments

  1. The first paragraph could have been describing me. I didn’t enjoy cooking because of the cleaning. Plus when we got married- the hub got home earlier then me and always cooked. While that was great and all- I usually got stuck with the aftermath and that guy could (and still can) wreck a kitchen! I dreaded cleaning all the stupid pots and pans because my husbands idea of cleaning is cramming the dishwasher full and thinking it all got clean. lol HA! Yep- the deglazing totally works! It will shine your pots up like nobody’s business! Funny thing is that it’s only been lately that I’ve discovered that on my own, since it’s only been the last year I’ve been the main cook and cleaner… :)

  2. Try Bon-ami as a big gun instead. VERY effective. I find mine at whole food and the co-op.

  3. Before you break out the big guns another thing to try is adding a little plain white vinegar to the hot water. That’s my first line of attack on my all clad pots and if that doesn’t work I bring out the big guns too.

    On another note, have you ever baked your bacon? A friend showed me this trick a year or so ago and I haven’t cooked bacon in a skillet since! I just place the slices in an rectangular pyrex dish and bake it at 400 until it’s crispy. It’s awesome because the glass pyrex is so easy to clean afterwards and I don’t have bacon splatters all over my cook top.

  4. Appreciate these tips! Would you have any advice for cleaning a burned stainless steel pot? I tried hot water & vinegar but that hasn’t done it. I’m wondering if I’ve completely ruined it. Thanks!

  5. Ah, yes. This makes me think of the first time I burnt the heck out of the nice new set of pans hubby got me. I, too, will declare my love for the deglazing method of cleaning, but I’ve had some real doozies. My favorite all-natural cleaning work horse? Norwex Cleaning Paste. It’s comprised of fine marble “flour” (marble that’s been ground down into a fine dust), chalk, natural soap, and traces of coconut oil. It comes in a 2 lb tub, looks like a brick of soap. You rub a kitchen cloth (a fine mesh non-abrasive cloth that has replaced all of my sponges for the greater good) to collect some paste, rub it onto the burnt on bad guys and rinse. Presto. I HIGHLY recommend it!

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